House clearance Wapping E1

We are an experienced waste disposal and house clearance company operating in Wapping. We offer environmentally friendly waste disposal service to domestic and commercial customers. If you live in Wapping and need a waste disposal or rubbish removal service, please contact us on 0800 009 2111 or 0203 301 1435 or email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or simply fill up our online quote form and one of our advisors will get in touch with you.

Few little facts about Wapping

Wapping is situated in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets which forms part of the Docklands to the east of the City of London. Wapping's proximity to the River Thames has given it a strong maritime character, which it retains through its riverside public houses and steps, such as the Prospect of Whitby and Wapping Stairs.

The area was first settled by Saxons, from whom it takes its name (meaning literally "[the place of] Wæppa's people").

In 1986, Rupert Murdoch's News International built a new £80m printing and publishing works in the north of Wapping. This became the scene of violent protests after News International's UK operation moved from Fleet Street to Wapping, with over 5,000 print workers being sacked when new technology was introduced resulting in a trade union dispute that became known as the "Battle of Wapping".

Wapping's greatest attraction is the Thames foreshore itself, and the venerable public houses that face onto it. A number of the old 'stairs', such as Wapping Old Stairs and Pelican Stairs (by the Prospect of Whitby) give public access to a littoral zone (for the Thames is tidal at this point) littered with flotsam, jetsam and fragments of old dock installations. Understandably it is popular with amateur archaeologists and treasure hunters - it is surprisingly easy for even a casual visitor to pick up a centuries-old shard of pottery here.

W.W. Jacobs, author of The Monkey's Paw was born in Wapping.

The American painter James McNeill Whistler, well known for his Thames views, painted Wapping when he lived at Wapping between October 1860 and 1864. The painting is permanently displayed at the National Gallery of Art Washington.

Sources: Wikipedia